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St. Vincent Medical Center



For physician referral, call (866) 478-8462. For general information, call (213) 484-7111.

To reach a patient, call (213) 484-7111. If you know their room number, call (213) 484-[7 + room number]. Patients can receive calls daily from 7:00 AM to 11:00 PM.


For physician referral, call (866) 478-8462. For general information, call (213) 484-7111.

To reach a patient, call (213) 484-7111. If you know their room number, call (213) 484-[7 + room number]. Patients can receive calls daily from 7:00 AM to 11:00 PM.

 

 St. Vincent Medical Center

Sports Medicine

Sports medicine encompasses the treatment and prevention of injuries related to sports and exercise. Orthopaedic treatments and procedures constitute a large part of this branch of medicine, and sports medicine physicians use the most advanced technological tools available.

Non-Operative Treatments

At Joint Replacement Institute, non-operative treatments such as physical therapy, trigger point injections, and other modalities can be prescribed to treat acute and chronic injuries. Common conditions treated include, but are not limited to, runner’s knee, ankle sprain and instability, frozen shoulder, shoulder rotator cuff injuries and shoulder instability.

ACL Reconstruction

The Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) is located in the center of the knee and is essential to the stability of the knee joint. A tear of this ligament can cause your knee to give way during physical activity, which could damage the surrounding structures (i.e. other ligaments, cartilage, menisci).

A torn ACL cannot be repaired and must instead be replaced with a tissue graft, which is the goal of ACL reconstruction surgery. Two alternative sources of replacement material for ACL reconstruction are commonly utilized: autografts (tissue harvested from the patient’s body) and allografts (tissue from a donor’s body). ACL reconstruction can be performed arthroscopically or by open surgery.

Surgeons performing ACL Reconstruction at the Joint Replacement Institute:

  • Dr. Samson
  • Dr. Wassef

Knee Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a procedure which utilizes a tiny camera to look inside the knee joint. This allows the surgeon to evaluate and treat knee disorders. Arthroscopy requires only small incisions around the knee for the insertion of small instruments that are about the size of a pen or pencil. With arthroscopy, degenerated and worn menisci can be trimmed and smoothed, which reduces one source of inflammation. Additionally, the lining of the knee (the synovium), can be trimmed, and this also decreases inflammation. Patients who have knee arthroscopy go home the same day. Recovery from surgery occurs over a couple of weeks.

Surgeons performing Knee Arthroscopy at the Joint Replacement Institute:

  • Dr. Schmalzried
  • Dr. Samson
  • Dr. Wassef

Knee Lateral Release

Knee pain can be produced by tight capsular structures (retinaculum) on the outer aspect (lateral aspect) of the kneecap. In this case, the kneecap does not slide well within the groove of the lower part of the femur and cartilage irritation can result.

A lateral release is a procedure performed to cut through this tight retinaculum, and allow the kneecap to sit properly within its groove during motion. The release may be done with open surgery or arthroscopically, depending on the surgeon’s preference and experience.

Whether open or arthroscopic, success of the lateral release depends more on proper patient selection than on the technique used.

Surgeons performing Knee Lateral Release at the Joint Replacement Institute:

  • Dr. Samson
  • Dr. Wassef

Knee Meniscal Repair

The menisci are pieces of cartilage that act like a cushion between the tibia and the femur. A torn meniscus may heal on its own if the tear is small enough. However more severe tears will require a surgical solution involving either the repair of the tear if the lesion is located in a part of the meniscus that receives good blood supply, or the removal (partial meniscectomy) of the affected region.

Knee Meniscal repair can be performed arthroscopically, which favors fast recovery times compared with open surgery.

Surgeons performing Meniscal Repair at the Joint Replacement Institute:

  • Dr. Samson

Shoulder Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy is a procedure which utilizes a tiny camera to look inside the shoulder joint. This allows the surgeon to evaluate and treat certain shoulder conditions such as small rotator cuff tears, or to repair or shave any loose bodies that may be floating in the joint. For example, Impingement Syndrome (bursitis) can be treated with arthroscopic removal of bone spurs. Patients having shoulder arthroscopic surgery usually go home the same day, while the length of recovery depends on the specific type of shoulder arthroscopic surgery performed.

Surgeons performing Shoulder Arthroscopy at the Joint Replacement Institute:

  • Dr. Samson
  • Dr. Wassef

Shoulder Reconstruction (Dislocation Repair)

After a shoulder dislocation or subluxation (a partial dislocation), the shoulder joint can be left unstable and more prone to other dislocations. This instability is usually related to a stretching or tearing of the static stabilizers (labrum, capsule and ligaments) that occurred during the dislocation. Shoulder instability usually requires Shoulder Reconstruction Surgery because further damage to the shoulder joint is likely to occur if left untreated.

Shoulder Reconstruction is a repair of the static stabilizers and can be performed both arthroscopically or as open surgery depending mainly on the extent of damage already present in the joint.

Surgeons performing Shoulder Reconstruction at the Joint Replacement Institute:

Rotator Cuff Repair

The rotator cuff is a group of muscles and tendons that hold the arm in its “ball and socket” joint and help the shoulder to rotate and move. The tendons can be torn from overuse or injury.

Rotator cuff repair is a type of surgery to repair a torn tendon in the shoulder. The procedure can be performed as open surgery or through arthroscopy, which uses smaller incisions.

Surgeons performing Rotator Cuff Repair at the Joint Replacement Institute:

  • Dr. Samson

Achilles Tendon Repair

Even though the Achilles tendon is the strongest tendon in the human body, its rupture is a fairly common injury in healthy, young, active individuals. Surgical repair is usually the treatment of choice because it is associated with a lower rate of re-injury and shorter recovery time compared with non-surgical treatments.

Surgical repair can be performed with a closed or an open technique. With the open technique, an incision is made to allow for better visualization and approximation of the tendon. With the closed (also called percutaneous) technique, the surgeon makes several small skin incisions through which the tendon is repaired. A short leg cast (plaster) is placed on the operated ankle after either of the procedures.

Surgeons performing Achilles Tendon Repair at the Joint Replacement Institute:

  • Dr. Samson
  • Dr. Saluta

Labral Repair

The socket of the shoulder joint is extremely shallow to allow maximum range of motion, and thus, is inherently unstable. Extra support to adequately hold the bones of the shoulder in place is provided by the labrum, a cuff of cartilage that circles the shoulder socket to make it deeper.

A torn labrum from a shoulder injury will need surgical repair if nonsurgical treatments fail to relieve pain. Most labral surgeries are now done arthroscopically and involve labrum debridement (removal of frayed edges and loose parts) and/or labral reattachment to the bone.

Surgeons performing Labral Repair at the Joint Replacement Institute:

  • Dr. Samson

Fracture repair

A fractured bone will typically repair itself if the broken extremities of the bone are close enough and maintained immobilized. However, a surgical intervention will often facilitate a fast and complete recovery, depending on the location of the fracture and the degree of displacement between the two (or more) broken parts of the bone.

Bone fracture repair is a surgery usually involving metal screws, pins, rods, or plates to hold the bone in place. It is also known as Open Reduction and Internal Fixation (ORIF) surgery.

Joint Replacement Institute surgeons performing general Fracture Repair:

  • Dr. Wassef

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